A Look Back at a Legacy

The Honourable Christy Clark led Canada’s third largest province for over six years. Throughout her tenure, Clark demonstrated the strongest performance of any Canadian Premier for economic growth, fiscal management and job creation.   

When she left office, British Columbia had been Canada’s economic leader for three years running – the first time that has happened since the 1960s. BC went from being 9th in job creation to 1st among provinces. And, after inheriting a deficit of $1.2B, Clark’s government went on to balance 5 consecutive budgets. Her last budget included $52B in revenues and boasted a $2.8B surplus. When she retired, BC was on-track to eliminating its operating debt by 2020 - the first time since 1976. BC was also the only Canadian province with a AAA credit rating.   

Clark retired from political life in 2017 as the longest serving female Premier in Canadian history and the only woman in Canada ever to be re-elected. 

Today she is a Senior Advisor at the internationally recognized law firm, Bennett Jones LLP. She also sits as a Board Director for Shaw Communications Inc., one of Canada’s 4 largest telecommunications companies; and for Recipe Unlimited Corporation, the owner of Canada’s most iconic restaurant brands. In addition, she serves as an Advisor for ThoughtWire Corp., an organization focused on advancing the Canadian tech sector. Recently she has also been appointed as an Associate Member for the InterAction Council. This is an international organization where former heads of state come together to find solutions to the political, economic and social problems of today’s world.

In her spare time she is serving as a volunteer for Roots of Empathy, which is an organization that works internationally to teach children empathy and kindness. 

Clark is now also being credited for bringing the liquefied natural gas industry to British Columbia. LNG Canada just approved a $40B LNG project in Kitimat, British Columbia. This is the single largest private sector investment in Canadian history.